Tell Your Story….
My    father    Alexander    Mark    joined    the    Ditchburn    Organisation around   1954   and   became   a   service/salesman,   initially   supplying his   own   car   for   the   job.   He   not   only   serviced   the   equipment technically,   but   also   changed   the   records   on   the   juke   boxes,   and     collected   the   cash   each   week,   with   a   percentage   going   to   the cafe   owner   his   job   also   involved   gaining   new   business   for   the company.   the   equipment   was   initially   the   MK1   and   the   cream music   maker.   eventually   company   cars   were   supplied   which   was a   Mk1   ford   consul,   but   during   the   Suez   canal   and   the   introduction of   petrol   rationing,   company   cars   were   laid   up   and   Lambretta scooters   were   issued.   things   progressed   and   the   Telematic   100 and   200   Jukeboxes   came   on   stream   and   the   upgraded   music maker   all   proving   popular,   but   competition   was   taking   customers with    Seeburg    /    Bal-Ami    etc    therefore    Ditchburn    brought    in Wurlitzer to keep up.
My   father   had   gathered   around   20   Mk1   and   Music   Maker Juke   Boxes   in   his      garage,   we   scrapped   them,   oh   dear   !     if   we   only   knew   what   we   know   now.   Eventually   my   father        became   sales   manager,   and   was   given   a   new   zephyr   v6. in   the   early   sixties   Ditchburn   built   a   new   factory   over   the road    and    started    to    manufacture    vending    machines, coffee,     cold     drinks,     and     snack     machines.     I     joined Ditchburn    in    1966,    working    at    Dock    Road    for    a    year making     vending     machines     before     traveling     back     to Scotland   in   my   new   minivan   as   a   service   engineer.   sadly in   1972   an   American   company   “national   vendors”   bought the   vending   side   of   the   business,   they   wanted   a   factory   in Britain   to   manufacture   and   sell   in   to   the   common   market all   outside   sales   and   service   staff   were   made   redundant, and   sadly   Michael   Town   (left)   who   was   the   sales   director took   his   own   life,   which   was   devastating,   I   think   he   felt   it was   his   fault   for   the   outcome   of   the   company   and   job losses.
Photo Ref: DB100 Courtesy of Freddy Bailey
Photo Ref: DB096 Courtesy of Barry Cartmell
  My time with Ditchburn, and also my Fathers time.    By Clive Mark
3. Posted 09-07-18
My   father   had   gathered   around   20   Mk1   and   Music   Maker Juke   Boxes   in   his      garage,   we   scrapped   them,   oh   dear   !     if   we   only   knew   what   we   know   now.   Eventually   my   father        became   sales   manager,   and   was   given   a   new   zephyr   v6. in   the   early   sixties   Ditchburn   built   a   new   factory   over   the road    and    started    to    manufacture    vending    machines, coffee,     cold     drinks,     and     snack     machines.     I     joined Ditchburn    in    1966,    working    at    Dock    Road    for    a    year making     vending     machines     before     traveling     back     to Scotland   in   my   new   minivan   as   a   service   engineer.   sadly in   1972   an   American   company   “national   vendors”   bought the   vending   side   of   the   business,   they   wanted   a   factory   in Britain   to   manufacture   and   sell   in   to   the   common   market all   outside   sales   and   service   staff   were   made   redundant, and   sadly   Michael   Town   (left)   who   was   the   sales   director took   his   own   life,   which   was   devastating,   I   think   he   felt   it was   his   fault   for   the   outcome   of   the   company   and   job losses.
In    the    late    sixties    Ditchburn    tied    up    a    deal    with    the Clairtone   corporation   to   import   a   range   of   very   up   market radiograms   and   sell   them   under   the   banner   of   Ditchburn Clairtone.   i   and   my   father   each   bought   one   and   paid   them up   on   hp   they   were   up   to   £700   each   i   think   most   of   the Ditchburn   staff   bought   one,   a   very   up   market   shop   was opened   in   St Anne’s   but   after   a   year   or   so   it   dwindled.   the Ditchburn    background    music    tape    deck    division    which was   for   hotels   shopping   centers   etc.   i   believe   Redifusion took   over   that   dept,   also   the   B.E.T   group   British   Electric Traction   originally   took   over   Ditchburn,   owned   by   a   group capt.    Hugh    Dundas    as    prior    to    my    redundancy    i    was transfered to B.E.T and B.E.L fitments of Accrington. 
Ditchburn      Clairtone      Stereogram,      model      no:      641 Signature,     A     contemporary     design     in     oiled     walnut, Matched   veneers   &   solids,   highlight   the   clean   lines   of   the long,   low   cabinet. This   has   a   central   lid,   Storage   space   for 25   records,   plus   Solid   State   T10E   chassis   with   automatic FM   Selector,   Garrard   Lab   80   changer,   Size=70   X   19   X   25 ins.                              Clive Mark .
Clive   has   also   sent   us   some   additional   photos   of   a   Ditchburn   Car   Badge   that   he   made   and   also   of   his   pack   of Ditchburn playing cards, that used to be given to the pubs for use by customers.
Photo Ref: DB187 Courtesy of Clive Mark
Photo Ref: DB185 Courtesy of Clive Mark
Photos Ref: DB200 to DB203 Courtesy of Clive Mark